I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

(Almost) Wordless Wednesday: Mrs. Harry Turner, of Great Marlow, Bucks

louisasmith touched up

The back of this photo says “Mrs. Harry Turner.” The question is this: Is she Louisa Smith, Harry’s first wife, whom he married in 1870; or is she Roseanna McGuinness, whom he married in 1884, following Louisa’s death?

Wordless Wednesday is a daily blogger prompt sponsered by Geneabloggers

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  • You might also like:In the beginningRediscovered PhotosAmanuensis Monday: Another Denchfield Will (part of a series)

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    Treasure Chest Thursday: The Birth Record for Ellen Collcutt (1841)

    emma blake name

    This week’s treasure find is the birth record for Ellen Collcutt, born in Jericho, St Thomas, Oxford, Oxfordshire, on 1 October 1841.

    It’s special significance for my research, is that Ellen’s mother is named. Prior to getting this certificate from the GRO, I’d had no success locating a marriage record for Ellen’s parents, so I didn’t know Emma’s maiden name. But thanks to this record, and the one for her brother James (they arrived in the mail together) I can now say she was Emma Blake.

    James Collcutt and Emma Blake had four children together, included noted Victorian architect Thomas Edward Collcutt. James was the son of William Collcutt and his second wife Jane Evans. You can read more about this family here

    (Treasure Chest Thursday is a daily blogging prompt hosted by Geneabloggers. It was originally suggested by Leslie Ann Ballou of Lost Family Treasures) Share:

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    Tech Tuesday: Frustrations with my Site.....

    089300-abstract-red-and-gold-paint-splatter-icon-signs-warning-man-working-sc44

    A reader has drawn my attention to the fact that the genealogy database section of this blog is no longer rendering the information correctly. Big sigh…..sometimes technology is NOT my friend. I suspect, although it’s mostly speculation, that the problems lies in a combination of (1) not having upgraded to the most recent versions of WordPress (what my site is built on) and TNG (my software of choice for housing my genealogy data, and (2) conflicts between WordPress, TNG, and Atahualpa (my beloved WordPress theme).

    I am at the NGS conference at the moment; am getting the newest issue of my genealogy society’s quarterly bulletin ready to go to print; and have some fast approaching client deadlines. So……I haven’t the time this week to invest in getting to the root of the problem and figuring out a solution, and I do know that diving headlong into quickie updates of WordPress and (…more)

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    Surname Saturday: The Ubiquitous Smiths of Lewknor, Oxfordshire

    smith image

    The more common the name, the more difficult the research can be, and my Smiths of Lewknor are right up there. Thomas Smith, a watercress grower, and his wife Eleanor “Ellen” Holland, raised a large family in Lewknor, Oxfordshire, in the mid 19th century. Smiths had lived in that area for decades, so Thomas’s brothers and cousins were also baptizing, and burying family members in the local church at the same time. There were also Smith families living in the nearby Postcombe, a hamlet so tiny it had no church of its own.

    Here are the records of Smith baptisms and burials during the time Thomas and Ellen lived in Lewknor. I’ve taken them from the published parish registers. The next step of course is to order the FHL microfilms to view the parish registers themselves. Births and deaths after the date range here would come from records at (…more)

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    Amanuensis Monday: Will of Spinster Sarah Collcutt of Oxford, 1835

    sarah collcutt will image

    Sarah Collcutt of Oxford (1750-1838), the daughter of grazier John and Sarah Collcutt, was quite wealthy, although the means by which she came by that wealth remains a mystery. Having no children of her own, she left her money and personal estate to her many nieces and nephews. Her will, made in 1835, is a virtual treasure trove of genealogical information. (Sarah Collcutt Will, 1835, The National Archives Public Records Office – Catalogue Reference:Prob 11/1895)

    In the name of God Amen I Sarah Collcutt of the parish of Saint Aldate in the City of Oxford Spinster considering the uncertainty of this life and the certainty of death and being at this time of sound and disposing mind and memory do make this my last Will and Testament in manner following that is to say I nominate and appoint my Niece Mary Godfrey Talmage Executrix of this my will and (…more)

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    Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - A Wordle Cloud

    wordle mum 3

    Thanks Randy Seaver at Genea-musings for suggesting this bit of Saturday Night Genealogy Fun!

    I used a blog article about our family’s heroine to generate this Wordle Cloud

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    How is Joseph James Collcutt Related to the Collcutt Families of Oxford?

    collcutt william 1851 census oxford

    A reader posed this question earlier in the week. Joseph James Collcutt is not in my direct line, and although I have researched many of the collateral lines in the Collcutt family, I had not followed this particular branch forward. Still, I love a mystery! Here’s what my initial research has turned up:

    Joseph James Collcutt was the son of William Collcutt and Anne Hemmins, who were married by license at the church of St Peter in the East, Oxford, on 9 July 1844. The entry in the parish register describes bachelor William as a college servant of that parish, son of William, yeoman; and spinster Anne, of St Clements parish, daughter of Thomas, yeoman. Witnesses were Catharine Collcutt, Julia Churchill Price, and John Lucas.[1] The couple baptized daughter Emily Ann at St Peter [2] while living on Long Wall Street, but then settled on High Street.

    William and Ann  baptized (…more)

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    I've Started Another Blog (actually 2)

    ernestnapoleon 2

    I think I read somewhere that I’m not supposed to do this; that it’s hard enough to stay on top of one blog, let alone three. But here’s my logic….

    Mahoganybox.net was created as a tribute to my grandparents and as a means of sharing their family trees and my adventures in researching my British roots from the comfort of my armchair in the United States. Sometimes I talk in general terms the other side of my tree, but I prefer to keep the focus on England. Still, I’ve amassed a wealth of info on my father’s side of the family and I am dying to share it and strike up some conversations with others who might be researching some of my French-Canadian lines. So…..

    I’d like to introduce ErnestNapoleon.net the blog I’ve started in tribute to my paternal grandparents: Ernest Napoleon Varrieur and Elsie Mae Ebert. My grandfather’s roots (…more)

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    52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy WK#11 - Technology

    52-Weeks-Abundant

    Technology. Always a favorite topic of mine! Much of it mystifies me, at least the nuts and bolts of the inner workings which make the magic of it all possible. But I’m definitely a happy “end-user.” Technology plays a huge part in creating the abundance of genealogically rich information I’ve been able to use in my research this last decade.  I use it every day in my research, especially for records in England.

    A few days ago, I stumbled upon a website that provides statistics on surname concentrations by county in England in the 1880s. To test the waters, I typed in Denchfield, and was surprised to learn that toward the end of the 19th century there were more Denchfields living in Oxfordshire than in Buckinghamshire. I had no idea. But it provided a new avenue for research that hadn’t occurred to me before. Perhaps some of my mysteriously (…more)

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    Review of the Year So Far

    remnants

    I can’t believe March is here…where did the winter go? (The shortish answer is….we never really had winter, just an odd snow fall or two and a couple brisk weeks of temps in the teens….altogether VERY STRANGE for our little corner of Northwest Pennsylvania)

    Genealogically speaking, time has flown. Although I made virtually NO progress on my personal research, I accomplished quite a bit:

    EDUCATION:

  • National Institute for Genealogical Studies
  • I completed Methodology parts 2 &3; US Census Records; US Vital Records; US Migration Patterns; and Researching French Canadian Ancestors.
  • Today I started Methodology part 4; US Cemetery and Mortuary Records; and Analysis and Skills Mentoring Program 1
  • ProGen13
  • Last month we wrote research reports (looking forward to our chat tonight!!)
  • This month the focus is on Editing and Proofreading
  • NGSQ Study Group – I only participated in one chat so far, but I really enjoyed it. So much (…more)
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