I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh GRIP

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I am at my first genealogy institute! I’ve been wanting to go to one since I first discovered there was such a thing, but the others (In Salt Lake City, Samford, and D.C.) conflict with family commitments. So, I was THRILLED when GRIP opened in Pittsburgh last year.  Check-in was today at 3. Welcome dinner at 5. It was really nice to run into friends. The institute is held at Pittsburgh’s La Roche College.  It’s fun to be in a dorm setting for the first time in eons, but I’m not liking the looks of the bed….in fact, I’m contemplating sleeping in my clothes, on top of the thread bare sheets, but that’s a bit beside the point, which is- I’m so excited to be here!!

I’m taking the Advanced Land Research course, taught by Rick and Pam Sayre.  Deeds and other land records are a big part of genealogy (…more)

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[Almost] Wordless Wednesday: Missing my grandparents

gggg

Wordless Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt sponsored by Geneabloggers

Feeling a little listless, lost, and ungrounded tonight. I spend so much time with the dead…poring through the past, trying to reconstruct lives from sometimes nothing more than scraps of barely legible paper…wondering who they were and what they would have wished people could know about  them now. I am so lucky to have had all four of my grandparents in my life for as long as they were. I was so loved. But, I wish I’d asked  them more questions. Not about facts and dates, but rather about their thoughts and the memories of all the little moments in their lives which they would have wanted me to keep safe in my memory for them.  I really want to get it right……Know what I mean? I’m not sure I’m explaining myself, but I want to post their picture before it’s Thursday. I hope (…more)

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Wordless Wednesday: A headache in the making...

IMAG0337

Wordless Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt sponsored by Geneabloggers Share:

  • You might also like:Ammanuensis Monday: 1766 Will of John Denchfield (part of a series)Amanuensis Monday: Richard Denchfield of Whitchurch, 1749 ( an ongoing series)[Almost] Wordless Wednesday: Missing my grandparents

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    Anniversary

    pianoforte

    Yikes! A reader alerted me to the fact that today is my (woefully neglected) blog’s 2nd anniversary! Lots of exciting things have been happening lately in my genealogical world, but unfortunately they’ve drawn me away from my beloved Mahoganybox…

    A few of the things…..

  • I’m nearly two thirds of the way through the NIGS Certificate in Genealogical research program for American Studies, and it’s been going really REALLY well
  • The processing of 11 Hollinger archival boxes of an Erie family’s personal papers is wrapping up. I’m quite proud of my 35+ page GUIDE FILE, but it’s taken up pretty much all of my time allotted for genealogical writing for the past few months.
  • I’m giving a talk at our genealogy society’s beginner workshop this month, and I want my Powerpoint to be perfect……
  • The ProGen assignment for the last two months has involved Proof Arguments….probably the most time (…more)
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  • Surname Saturday: My Turners of Oxfordshire, Berkshire, & Bucks

    Reprinted with permission.

     

    Reprinted with permission.

    I wrote about the Turners in this post, and this is an expansion of that. This is a summary of the Turner surnames found, mainly, in St. Peter’s (Caversham) parish register transcriptions.[[1]]  Caversham, Emmer Green, Henley,Kidmore are situated in Oxfordshire. Other counties are indicated.

    Below is my direct line from John Turner to,  Henry, my 2nd great grandfather. You’ll find more details here: Henry & Charles Turner and John Turner of Emmer Green. More information about John Turner’s family can be found here: John Turner’s Children and William Turner. Most of this has been taken from published parish transcripts. Please, if you are incorporating any of this data into your own trees, check the original entries in the parish records for any transcription errors or additional information, as I will be doing also.

     

    1-John Turner b: 23 October 1782, Caversham, d: 2 July 1856, Caversham

    (…more)

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    Changes...

    MB900078707

    One of the things which drove me to create this blog was the desire to share my own research with others connected in some way with my British ancestors. Although I originally planned to upload static pages exported from my favorite genealogy software, Rootsmagic, I soon discovered a much more flexible and dynamic option – The Next Generation (TNG). With this software, I was able to upload my Rootsmagic gedcom file and the resulting database created a seemingly endless array of reports based on the user’s search filters.

    I’ve been researching my family history for 30 years, so I had a lot of information to upload Then, I took the Boston University Online Genealogical Research course, and I learned all kinds of things that took my research to a new level: I learned there is a  right way  to cite; and I was introduced to  good research techniques, standards, proof arguments, etc. (…more)

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    Amanuensis Monday: Another Hugh Filbee

    hugh filbee 1772

    Hugh Filbee of Lewknor, Oxfordshire, Letters of Administration 30 May 1772 Oxfordshire Records Office: ref Arch b.32 f.66  

    [page] 66

                                             May 30th 1772

    “Appeared personally Hugh PhFilbee and alledged that Hugh PhFilbee late of the parish of Lewknor in the County of Oxford deceased died in the Month of April last a Widower intestate without making a will and that he the Appearer is his natural and lawful son Wherefore he prayed Letters of Administration of all and singular the Goods Chattels and Credits of the said deceased to be granted to him on giving the usual Security—

                 Let Administration pass as prayed              the said Hugh PhFilbee    having              been sworn duly to administrator as              usual Before me                            D Burton, Chancellor                            Present Andw Not. Pub.”

    (Amanuensis Monday is a daily blogging prompt hosted by Geneabloggers) Share:

  • You might also like:Amanuensis Monday: Awdry (…more)

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    More on the Will of Hugh Filbee of Lewknor, 1757

    hugh will graphic

    Earlier in the week, I transcribed the 1756 will of Hugh Filbee, yeoman of Lewknor, Oxfordshire. What does Hugh’s will tell us?

    ___________________________________

    Hugh’s Death

    Although nothing in the probate mentions the exact date of Hugh’s death, we do know the date it was proved: 16 January 1767. This coincides with the burial of Hugh Filbee in Lewknor on 14 January 1767.  (See chart)

    Hugh’s Occupation

    “I Hugh Filbee of the parish of Lewknor in the County of Oxford Yoem[an]“

    Hugh was a gentleman farmer.

    We also know he owned land, which he’d purchased during his lifetime vs having inherited it.

    He left sons Hugh and Henry equal share in “All that my Freehold Estate which I lately purchased of Mr. William Rolles commonly called Steven’s Farm,” were “situate within the precincts of Lewknor aforesaid or in a Meadow called Shillingford Mead.” Additionally, he left son (…more)

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    Amanuensis Monday: Will of Hugh Filbee of Lewknor, 1756

    filbee will

    Yeoman Hugh Filbee was buried in St Margaret’s churchyard in Lewknor, Oxfordshire, on 14 January 1767. Here is a transcription of his will. While it sheds light on the names of his children, and suggests his wife had predeceased him, it provides few if any clues which help distinguish him from the various Hugh Filbees who had been baptized at St. Margaret’s and were living in Lewknor in the mid 18th century. Still, it’s a start

    Will of Hugh Filbee of Lewknor, Oxfordshire   Made 24 May 1756; proved 26 January 1767 Oxfordshire Records Center: ref 24/3/3 [To facilitate online viewing, the following transcription does not reflect the line breaks of the original document.]

    “In the Name of God Amen. The Twenty Fourth day of May [word scratched out] in the Twenty Ninth Year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Second by the Grace of God (…more)

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    Surname Saturday: Filbee

    filbee chart

    A reader’s question prompted me to revisit my problematic Filbee family, whose fondness for the given name Hugh makes researching this line difficult.

    The Filbee surname is found in my maternal grandfather’s part of the family tree. Alice Filbee, and generations of Filbees before her, lived and died in Lewknor, Oxfordshire. Alice (1748–1819) was my 5th great grandmother. She married William Quartermaine in Lewknor on Christmas Eve 1768. Their grandson was Thomas Smith, whom I’ve written about here.

    In researching this surname over the years, I’ve come across many variations, including: Fylbye, Filby, Filbie, Fillby, Felby, Philby, Philbey.  Filbee families were scattered all around Oxfordshire in the 17th-19th centuries, but my particularly confusing branch lived in Lewknor. From the parish register transcripts, it’s clear that, at any given time, there were two or more Filbee men living in the village, but I’m most interested in those named Hugh.  There (…more)

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