I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

Which Hugh Filbee died in Lewknor, Oxfordshire, in 1767?

hugh will graphic

I wish I knew.

For some time, I’ve been attempting to sort out the kinships and identities of the various Hugh Filbees of Lewknor, Oxfordshire. If you were a Hugh Filbee living at the foot of the Chiltern Hills in the 1600s and 1700s, you most likely had a son, perhaps a brother or, even more likely, a cousin, named Hugh, and there’s a good chance you married a woman named Alice or Ann.

Crikey.

If you examine the parish registers of St Margaret’s at Lewknor, and St Mary’s at Adwell, you’ll find mention of myriad men named Hugh Filbee dating back to the earliest entries. I wrote about the Lewknor register in this post. In 1585,  Hugh Filbee and his wife Alice (of course) baptized son William at Adwell. Jump ahead  in that register a hundred or so years to March, 1708/9, and you’ll discover the baptism, and (…more)

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Will of John Denchfield, 1734 (part of the Denchfield series)

denchfield mark 1734

It never ends….any given decade in the 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s finds two, if not more, men named John Denchfield strolling the streets of North Marston, marrying women named Ann, Mary, or Elizabeth, raising sons named John and Richard, involving themselves in church business, land conveyances, marrying daughters named Ann, Elizabeth, and Mary to fellow gentleman farmers,and in the process leaving a paper trail that has confounded Denchfield family historians for hundreds of years. or NOT. Maybe I’m the only one confounded. Maybe to everyone else it’s clear. But the more Denchfield facts I discover, the more confused I become.

In the 1730s, one such John Denchfield made a living making malt brandy, on propreties he owned in North Marston and Quainton, Bucks. Among family historians, he is thought to be the son of  John Denchfield, ironmonger, whose 1688 will, transcribed here, left property in Quainton to underage son Richard, (…more)

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What I'm Working On Now....

nomarston register

Aside from the fact that using an ancient, hand-crank style, microfilm reader at my local FHL to scroll through pages and pages of 17th century parish registers makes me motion sick (and what kind of genealogist does that make me??), it’s heart wrenching to discover the explanation for the gaps in the North Marston church records is that HUGE chunks have been ripped out of them…grrrr

I’m beginning to think that the mystery of the John Denchfields of North Marston, Bucks has no hope of ever being solved….. Share:

  • You might also like:Gefferie Denchfield, part 2Mathew Denchfield, yeoman of North Marston (4th part in a series)Got a Nice Surprise in my Inbox Tonight

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    Mystery Monday aka The Brick Wall Known as John Denchfield (another in a series)

    denchfield box

    The Denchfields were an old Buckinghamshire family who entered my paternal British line with the marriage of Ann Denchfield to William Baker on the 1st of May, 1784. The couple married in St. Mary’s Church in North Marston, where Denchfields had been baptized, married, and buried for hundreds of years; certainly before official parish record keeping began in 1600, but unfortunately nothing earlier has survived. The Denchfields’ lives are fairly well documented in North Marston, however their propensity for naming sons John and Richard, leads to an early 18th century brick wall.

    Ann Denchfield was 21 when she married William Baker. She had lived all her life in North Marston and was the sixth child produced from the union of John Denchfield and Mary Gurney.

    Here is the Denchfield portion of Ann’s Ahnentafal, which runs into its brick wall three generations back [unless otherwise noted, all events took place (…more)

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    Mystery Monday and the Curious Tale of the Handkerchief Box

    handkerchief box

    A few years ago, on a sultry Tuesday morning in what may have been Maine’s hottest August on record, I was strolling down Water Street in Hallowell, doing a little antiquing with my Mother-in-Law. It wasn’t turning out to be a fruitful hunt, and we were withering in the heat and about to call it a day when I stepped into Love Joy Antiques and happened upon a small Flemish Art box with “Handkerchiefs” carved into the lid. I’d been collecting old boxes for some time and knew this would be an interesting addition. The wood and the hinges were in good shape, but the inside lining was torn and shabby. I set it aside, and we headed to Hattie’s to cool off and have some lunch. Afterwards we stopped in one more shop where I found a lovely collection of vintage hankies. This seemed like Providence. I purchased (…more)

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    Ongoing Research

    caversham st peter

    It’s been a while since I posted, but I have been very busy researching parts of the line, and it occurred to me that I could talk about some of the ongoing research so that anyone interested can see the progress, or possibly even make a contribution! A family history is never static and is more likely to flourish when treated as a collaborative effort rather than an individual pursuit. So here goes……the puzzles that are currently consuming me   Feel free to jump in any time!!

    It’s the start of a new year, and with that I have decided to take another look at the problematic William TURNER of Caversham -  husband of Miss Anne WELLSs, GGG Grandfather to my Grandfather Ted, and progenitor of the Caversham and Winslow TURNERS.

    William’s marriage was solemnized at St. Peter’s Church in Caversham, Oxfordshire on 25 September 1769. The entry in the parish register transcription had (…more)

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