I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

Mystery Monday: Just Who Was Mary Denchfield of the Wealds?

All Saints Parish Church in Wing

…Mary Denchfield of the Weald Grounds in the parrish of Wing in the County of Bucks Dary Woman Being of Sound mind and perfect memory praised be God for it… made a will on 7 January 1733/34. In it, she made arrangements for her nephew Richard Denchfield and her kinswoman Elizabeth Penn to receive 50 shillings apiece following her death, with the bulk of her estate going to her nephew Mathew Denchfield. The record of her burial at Wing’s All Saints Church on 7 March 1734, described her as a “widow from Cotsloe,” a hamlet just west of the village, which is today known as Cottesloe Farm on Cublington Road. 

All Saints Parish Church in Wing

  But who was she?  

  • If she really was a widow, she made no mention of it in her will, nor did she acknowledge any living children or grandchildren.
  • (…more)
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  • Mystery Monday aka The Brick Wall Known as John Denchfield (another in a series)

    denchfield box

    The Denchfields were an old Buckinghamshire family who entered my paternal British line with the marriage of Ann Denchfield to William Baker on the 1st of May, 1784. The couple married in St. Mary’s Church in North Marston, where Denchfields had been baptized, married, and buried for hundreds of years; certainly before official parish record keeping began in 1600, but unfortunately nothing earlier has survived. The Denchfields’ lives are fairly well documented in North Marston, however their propensity for naming sons John and Richard, leads to an early 18th century brick wall.

    Ann Denchfield was 21 when she married William Baker. She had lived all her life in North Marston and was the sixth child produced from the union of John Denchfield and Mary Gurney.

    Here is the Denchfield portion of Ann’s Ahnentafal, which runs into its brick wall three generations back [unless otherwise noted, all events took place (…more)

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    Mystery Monday: Wedding Photo ID

    turner collins wedding smaller

    My maternal Grandparents, Edward George TURNER and Phyllis Mary COLLINS, were married in Winslow Buckinghamshire England on 23 January 1938. This photo did not surface until both my grandparents had passed away, and unfortunately no one in the family can identify the man and woman standing on either side of Granddad. The girl to Ted’s right is his younger sister, but the identify of the couple standing, presumably the best man and maid of honor, is a mystery.

    (Mystery Monday is a blog series hosted by Geneabloggers) Share:

  • You might also like:In the beginningOngoing ResearchWordless Wednesday – Elsie Mae (Ebert) Varrieur

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    Mystery Monday and the Curious Tale of the Handkerchief Box

    handkerchief box

    A few years ago, on a sultry Tuesday morning in what may have been Maine’s hottest August on record, I was strolling down Water Street in Hallowell, doing a little antiquing with my Mother-in-Law. It wasn’t turning out to be a fruitful hunt, and we were withering in the heat and about to call it a day when I stepped into Love Joy Antiques and happened upon a small Flemish Art box with “Handkerchiefs” carved into the lid. I’d been collecting old boxes for some time and knew this would be an interesting addition. The wood and the hinges were in good shape, but the inside lining was torn and shabby. I set it aside, and we headed to Hattie’s to cool off and have some lunch. Afterwards we stopped in one more shop where I found a lovely collection of vintage hankies. This seemed like Providence. I purchased (…more)

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