I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

Blogiversary! It's Been a Great Year!!!!

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Yesterday was the one year anniversary of this blog It’s been a great year! Blogging has given me a chance to delve deeper into palaeography and my beloved Denchfields. Blogging prompts (thanks Thomas and Tonia!!!) have been a creative inspiration and a big help to my writing. I’ve connected with distant cousins from around the world and met some fascinating people on the message boards at Rootschat.com, at the genealogical and family history societies I’ve joined, and through the 2011 Spring Boston University Certificate in Genealogical Research program and the ongoing ProGen13 study group. Also can’t forget to mention my fellow bloggers and Twitter co-horts   

This past year, I’ve enrolled in classes at the National Institute of Genealogical Studies, completed a draft of Turner Collins Genealogy  my family history book, traveled to England for a family vacation/genealogical research fieldtrip, and begun volunteering at the local county history (…more)

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September Progress Report

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Way back at the beginning of August, I laid out a genealogy plan for the rest of the summer. It was a really busy summer. While I didn’t accomplish everything on my list, I made a dent and then some…

Research

  • My beloved Denchfields, a real thorn in my side these days… Mike Dewey of the Buckinghamshire Family History Society kindly sent copies of several wills which, while they filled in some gaps, threw a wrench into one of my working theories of this confusing branch of my family.
  • In depth study of the Peaches of Peterborough – took a backseat when I discovered my Denchfield error.
  • An opportunity presented itself to spend time on my father’s maternal German ancestors and it was a refreshing change of pace. I find it interesting that I’ve been able to go back hundreds of years in my UK research, but I’ve run (…more)
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  • Evidence Explained

    evidence explained

    Back in the beginning of my journey into the past, practically before the earth’s crust had cooled, I did what I think a lot of newbie genealogists are guilty of: I didn’t keep track of my sources. My first pedigree chart, drawn so carefully with pencil and ruler, was based on facts gleaned from conversations with my grandparents and family remembrance.

    To my credit, on family trips to England during my teen years, when I was able to coerce my grandfather to take me to the local records repository, or to traipse through an ancient cemetery in search of headstones, I did take notes, recording the place we’d visited and what discoveries I’d made there. But the idea of a bibliography was alien to me. Because I love old letters and aging paper, I did at least save the replies from vicars and distant family, sent in answer (…more)

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    Learned Genealogy

    knowledge poster

    I’ve loved genealogy for most of my life. Being knowledgeable about what I’m doing has always been paramount to me, so naturally I want to be as educated about genealogy as I can, particularly so I can achieve the goals I wrote about in this post Just having a love affair with genealogy isn’t going to cut it.

    It’s been a sporadic, occasional sort of affair, especially in the early days before computers: when months would go by waiting for a response to appear in the mailbox. Definitely a love hate relationship. To find a genealogical nugget of gold in an anxiously awaited, hand-written reply was to feel the exhiliration of a romantic summer afternoon; a new familial connection was a promise of a brightly budding romance. The absence of reliable evidence or running into that dreaded brickwall brought the sting of doubt and distrust, or worse: the unwelcome (…more)

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