I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

Surname Saturday: The English MEADOWS

annie detail (2)

It’s Surname Saturday and today it’s all about the MEADOWS branch of my family tree.Miss Annie Imogen Emily MEADOWS, pictured here, was my Grandfather Ted’s maternal Grandmother, and my Great Great Grandmother. She married my Great Great Grandfather, Henry Thomas BAKER, on 10 September 1883, at the parish church in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, England. Here is the MEADOWS portion of Annie’s Ahnentafel:

1. Annie Imogen Emily MEADOWS was born 29 Oct 1863 in Winslow, Bucks; she died on 3 May 1925 in Hoggeston, Bucks.

2. George MEADOWS, was baptized 3 Feb 1828 in Adderbury, Oxfordshire; he married Esther SELLAR (his second wife) on 1 Jan 1863 in Winslow, Bucks; he died 26 Sep 1881 in Winslow, Bucks. George was a hairdresser.

3. Esther SELLAR, daughter of Henry SELLAR and Charlotte TOMPKINS, was born 25 October 1841 in Winslow, Bucks; she died 1 Dec 1924 in Northampton, Northamptonshire.

George MEADOWS and (…more)

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Ongoing Research

caversham st peter

It’s been a while since I posted, but I have been very busy researching parts of the line, and it occurred to me that I could talk about some of the ongoing research so that anyone interested can see the progress, or possibly even make a contribution! A family history is never static and is more likely to flourish when treated as a collaborative effort rather than an individual pursuit. So here goes……the puzzles that are currently consuming me   Feel free to jump in any time!!

It’s the start of a new year, and with that I have decided to take another look at the problematic William TURNER of Caversham -  husband of Miss Anne WELLSs, GGG Grandfather to my Grandfather Ted, and progenitor of the Caversham and Winslow TURNERS.

William’s marriage was solemnized at St. Peter’s Church in Caversham, Oxfordshire on 25 September 1769. The entry in the parish register transcription had (…more)

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The Thing About Family Lore....

frederick turner ruptured spleen

Family tradition holds that Frederick Turner, my British Great-Grandfather Leonard’s only brother, was killed in action in India during World War I. Adding charm to the story that I heard frequently as a child was the idea that Leonard, distraught over his brother’s death and wishing to honor his memory, decided to drop his own given name and assume his dead brother’s, both in day to day living as well as on legal documents. Although my Grandfather and his sisters never knew their Uncle, they did know the story of his heroic death and grew up thinking of their father as “Frederick” L. Turner.

The notes from my earliest attempts at recording my British genealogy reflect this family lore, however as my own research began to reveal more of the details of the Turner brothers’ lives, the accuracy of the story came into question.

I knew from my grandfather’s (…more)

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In the beginning

Jean turner 1938

For me, as I suspect for many, the tracing of my roots began simply,with a curiosity to know where I came from and a conversation with an older relative.  I was 13. A few hastily scribbled notes based on family remembrance  may or may not have proven to be accurate, but at least it was a start.

Although my English grandparents lived  a continent away and I saw them only once every year or so, they seem to have found my interest in the past somewhat entertaining, and were always willing to share another story, or dig out an old photograph or two.  Summer visits would invariably include a trek out to an old cemetary or, if I was really lucky, I could persuade Granddad to walk over to Delapre Abby and sit with me for an hour or two while I pored over old documents in the records office.

I took my (…more)

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