I’d like to introduce…

Edward George "Ted" Turner

Edward George Turner, known affectionately to his family and friends as Ted, was a kind hearted, gregarious, right jolly English gent, loved by all who knew him. He was born on the 27th of June 1911 at Blake Cottage, Horn Street in Winslow, Buckinghamshire, where his father was employed as head groom to Mr Gosling of Blake House.

And His Lovely Wife…

phyllis

Miss Phyllis Mary Collins, daughter of William Collins, publican of the George Inn in Winslow, which is where Ted met her one fateful day in the 1930s

Which Hugh Filbee died in Lewknor, Oxfordshire, in 1767?

hugh will graphic

I wish I knew.

For some time, I’ve been attempting to sort out the kinships and identities of the various Hugh Filbees of Lewknor, Oxfordshire. If you were a Hugh Filbee living at the foot of the Chiltern Hills in the 1600s and 1700s, you most likely had a son, perhaps a brother or, even more likely, a cousin, named Hugh, and there’s a good chance you married a woman named Alice or Ann.

Crikey.

If you examine the parish registers of St Margaret’s at Lewknor, and St Mary’s at Adwell, you’ll find mention of myriad men named Hugh Filbee dating back to the earliest entries. I wrote about the Lewknor register in this post. In 1585,  Hugh Filbee and his wife Alice (of course) baptized son William at Adwell. Jump ahead  in that register a hundred or so years to March, 1708/9, and you’ll discover the baptism, and (…more)

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Sentimental Sunday: William Okey & Elizabeth Hales [A New Series]

isle of ely map old

WILLIAM OKEY was my 4x Great Grandfather, in my Grandmother’s MOYSES branch of the family. I’ve always had something of a soft spot for William. He didn’t live a long life, and I think what life he did live was difficult. He was born at the hamlet of March, Cambridgeshire, on 31 May 1819, and was the son of CLEMENT OKEY and ELIZABETH RUST. [1]

March is part of the Isle of Ely, which was once an island set amid marshy fens.  Before the draining of the Fens, March was essentially an island in its own right, and, thanks to its proximity to the River Nene, operated as a successful 16th century port and market town. It’s known around the world as the home of St Wendreda, a gothic style church with a hammer beam roof carved with 120 wooden angels. It’s the only church in the world dedicated (…more)

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(Almost) Wordless Wednesday: Mrs. Harry Turner, of Great Marlow, Bucks

louisasmith touched up

The back of this photo says “Mrs. Harry Turner.” The question is this: Is she Louisa Smith, Harry’s first wife, whom he married in 1870; or is she Roseanna McGuinness, whom he married in 1884, following Louisa’s death?

Wordless Wednesday is a daily blogger prompt sponsered by Geneabloggers

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  • You might also like:Rediscovered PhotosMystery Monday aka That Brick Wall Known as John Denchfield (another in a series)Amanuensis Monday – 1817 Will of Mary Denchfield of Aston Abbotts

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    How is Joseph James Collcutt Related to the Collcutt Families of Oxford?

    collcutt william 1851 census oxford

    A reader posed this question earlier in the week. Joseph James Collcutt is not in my direct line, and although I have researched many of the collateral lines in the Collcutt family, I had not followed this particular branch forward. Still, I love a mystery! Here’s what my initial research has turned up:

    Joseph James Collcutt was the son of William Collcutt and Anne Hemmins, who were married by license at the church of St Peter in the East, Oxford, on 9 July 1844. The entry in the parish register describes bachelor William as a college servant of that parish, son of William, yeoman; and spinster Anne, of St Clements parish, daughter of Thomas, yeoman. Witnesses were Catharine Collcutt, Julia Churchill Price, and John Lucas.[1] The couple baptized daughter Emily Ann at St Peter [2] while living on Long Wall Street, but then settled on High Street.

    William and Ann  baptized (…more)

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    New Warwickshire Records and the Howkins Family

    240px-Warwickshire_UK_location_map_svg

    It’s always nice to get an email from a previously unknown, distantly related, fellow family history researcher. I got one yesterday, about the Howkins/Hawkins family of Willoughby, Warwickshire. They’re one of my more obscure lines, tying into my Collins and Collcutts of Oxford in the 19th century, and I haven’t done much research on them. (I was in Warwickshire this summer, visiting the castle with my family, but it didn’t occur to me at the time that I had ancestors who’d lived nearby….sigh)

    Mary Ann Howkins married boatman Charles Curtis at St Peter le Bailey Church in Oxford City on Valentine’s Day 1842 (Oxfordshire, England, marriage certificate, Charles Curtis & Mary Ann Howkins; 1842, Jan-Feb-Mar, Oxford, Vol. 16:129; General Records Office, Kew, copy held by author).  They would eventually move to Taplow, Bucks, where Charles ran the Clivedon Ferry across the Thames for many years. But before that, the couple lived in (…more)

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    Surname Saturday: The Collcutts of Oxford - a new series

    Formerly The Plough Inn, St Aldates Street; William Collcutt Proprietor

    Collcutts have lived in and around Oxford for hundreds of years and are among the first names recorded in parish registers throughout the city in the early 1600s, when it became common practice for established churches to keep a written record of ecclesiastical events.

    Among the Collcuts from whom I’m descended, were gentlemen farmers, glovers, carriage makers, and innkeepers.They were a family filled with interesting characters and lots of mysteries; some of the most puzzling of any I’ve come across in my personal research. To begin my series on the Collcutts, here is a genealogical sketch of the family based on my research to date.

    First Generation

    1. Samuel COLLCUTT [1] came from Berkshire county and was probably born around 1660. Samuel lived in Berkshire in 1704. He died on 11 Jun 1729 in St Aldates.[2]

    There are hints in the parish register that suggest Samuel’s wife was named Mary, (…more)

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    Wordless Wednesday - 22 September 1962

    The Turner Sisters

    Taken at a wedding in Northampton, England: Jean (Turner) Barker to the left; Gladys (Turner) Lee to the right; their Mum, Lorrie Esther (Baker) Turner at center.

    (Wordless Wednesday is a daily blogging prompt sponsered by Geneabloggers) Share:

  • You might also like:Ongoing ResearchMystery Monday: Wedding Photo IDWordless Wednesday: The Old Ebert Homestead

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    Update on the Mystery of Awdry (Knowles) Denchfield

    "Denchfield Family of Whitchurch Pedigree," ref D58/23, Pedigress of Whitcurch families compiled 1895-1909, photographed by Michael Dewey August 2011, copy held by C. Butler; Antiquarian Notes and Papers of G.W. Wilson Relating To Whitchurch, Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies, Aylesbury.

    A while back, I transcribed the will of Awdry Denchfield, widow of John Denchfield. From the bequests in Awdry’s will, it appears she had been the widow of a Mr. Knowles at the time of her marriage to John Denchfield, and that she was the mother of at least three daughters and one son:

  • George Knowles, under age
  • Elizabeth Collins
  • deceased daughter, wife of William French
  • deceased daughter, wife of John Chandler
  • From other records, I was able to infer that John and Awdry’s marriage must have taken place after 1677, but the marriage is not recorded in the parish registers for North Marston, where the couple lived until John’s death in 1689, nor did it turn up in a search on FamilySearch. The Buckinghamshire Family History Society ran a search on Denchfield, and its many variants, in their database of marriages from all extant parishes in Buckinghamshire, with no success. (…more)

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    Got a Nice Surprise in my Inbox Tonight

    denchfield henry 1662 will

    The very kind Mike Dewey of the Buckinghamshire Family History Society, BFHS,  made a visit (several actually) to the Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies, CBS, on my behalf and sent me images of several Denchfield wills today, including this one made by Henry Denchfield of Quainton in 1662.  Thank you Mike Dewey!!!! Although the Internet is a wonderful thing, making available all sorts of records from around the world, there is so much more to be had. Over the next several months, Mike will be scanning  manorial records, court rolls, court books, terriers, and village surveys dating back to the 1600s, in search of references to my Denchfields and any clues which may help sort out the jumble of Johns, Richards, Marys and Elizabeths which have haunted me for years. I have nearly exhausted sources available online for my Denchfields, including census records, parish register transcripts, some probate records and land conveyances, (…more)

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    Will of John Denchfield, 1734 (part of the Denchfield series)

    denchfield mark 1734

    It never ends….any given decade in the 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s finds two, if not more, men named John Denchfield strolling the streets of North Marston, marrying women named Ann, Mary, or Elizabeth, raising sons named John and Richard, involving themselves in church business, land conveyances, marrying daughters named Ann, Elizabeth, and Mary to fellow gentleman farmers,and in the process leaving a paper trail that has confounded Denchfield family historians for hundreds of years. or NOT. Maybe I’m the only one confounded. Maybe to everyone else it’s clear. But the more Denchfield facts I discover, the more confused I become.

    In the 1730s, one such John Denchfield made a living making malt brandy, on propreties he owned in North Marston and Quainton, Bucks. Among family historians, he is thought to be the son of  John Denchfield, ironmonger, whose 1688 will, transcribed here, left property in Quainton to underage son Richard, (…more)

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